WIndows Command For-loop

for /f "delims=*" %f in ('dir "C:\folder\of\files\*.efs" /b') DO C:\folder\of\executable\program.exe -f "C:%~pf%f"
  1. A standard debugging technique is to insert the echo command into scripts and even compound/complex commands.  If you do
    for /f "delims=*" %a in ('dir *.avi /b /s') do @echo md "%~na"
    

    you’ll get the output

    "file 1"
    "file 2"
    "file 3"
    "file 4"
    

    Notes:

    • The @ prevents the echo commands themselves from displaying, so you see only their output.
    • "delims=…" tells for how to parse the lines of output from the dir *.avi /b /s command.  I don’t know why the answer you linked to suggests "delims=*".  But the default behavior is to break lines apart at spaces, so, if your directory and/or file names contain spaces (as you indicated), you should use "delims=" (specifying that there are no delimiters) to get this to work.
  2. If you type for /? or help for, you’ll get documentation on the for command.  Down in the fifth page, you’ll see
    In addition, substitution of FOR variable references has been enhanced.
    You can now use the following optional syntax:
    
        %~I         - expands %I removing any surrounding quotes (")
                         ︙ 
        %~pI        - expands %I to a path only
        %~nI        - expands %I to a file name only
                         ︙ 
    
    The modifiers can be combined to get compound results …
                             ︙ 
    

    which explains why %~na is getting you just the file name of the *.avi files whose full names are in %a.  Now try

    for /f "delims=" %a in ('dir *.avi /b /s') do @echo md "%~pa"
    

    and you’ll get

    "the_current_directory\Folder A\"
    "the_current_directory\Folder A\"
    "the_current_directory\Folder B\"
    "the_current_directory\Folder B\"

    From which we can conclude that you want to do

    for /f "delims=" %a in ('dir *.avi /b /s') do md "%~pa%~na"
    

    to create the file 1 and file 2 directories under Folder A, and the file 3 and file 4 directories under Folder B.   And, as @dave_thompson_085 points out, you can combine %~pa%~na into %~pna.

https://superuser.com/questions/1033360/how-do-i-execute-commands-on-files-in-multiple-folders

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